FROZEN POOP PILLS

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poop-pills

How badly do you want to loose weight?  For those who do not want to exercise or change your diet it may be possible to ingest a slim person’s poop and recolonize your digestive tract.

The theory is simply transplanting a slim person poop in to an obese person’s digestive system.  Scientists are preparing to test if microbes taken from a lean person’s system can help an obese person lose weight – and they will do this by getting 20 obese volunteers to take a pill packed with freeze-dried poop. 

These treatments actually began three years ago for serious gut infections rather than fecal transplants.  Doctors have increasingly turned to a procedure called “fecal microbiotia transplantation” (FMT), which delivers fresh fecal material to the gut helping restore the normal balance of beneficial microbes.

These fecal transplants are about 90 percent successful, but they typically require invasive and uncomfortable colonoscopies or nasogastric tubes, which run from the nose down to the stomach. “Just getting the tube down is a problem,” says Elizabeth Hohmann MD of Massachusetts General Hospital.  And what if people gag and vomit? Would they inhale fecal matter? “That’s pretty scary,” she adds.

I remember asking my audience if they were a sinker or a floater?  The idea was to open up the discussion on the amount of poop we expel and how many times a day would indicate a healthy system.

I have always been interested in the different body types versus their diets.  Now accepted body typing is done by medical personnel using one’s feces to determine their specific fecal type.  Formulation begins by using another’s fecal-matter which contains microbes from poorly digested food debris, missing nutrients – freeze drying and capsulizing!

 

Women’s Waistlines Continues To Inch Up

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1c6623b6e6ae0574_tapeWomen’s waistlines are widening faster than men’s, according to new government research.

The average waist size ballooned more than an inch — from 37.6 inches to 38.8 inches — between 1999 and 2012, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention researchers found.

While men’s waists increased less than an inch — about 0.8 of an inch on average — women’s midriffs grew about twice that, or 1.5 inches, said study researcher Dr. Earl Ford, a medical officer at the CDC.

“Carrying a large belly even in the normal weight range has health implications,” said Dr. James Cerhan, lead author of the study and professor of epidemiology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Waistlines larger than 35 inches for women and more than 40 inches for men are considered abdominal obesity, a risk factor for heart disease and diabetes.

For one study, published Sept. 17 in the Journal of the American Medical Association, Ford and his colleagues used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) on nearly 33,000 men and women ages 20 and older.

No single reason for the bulking up stood out. But the researchers speculated that sleep disruption, certain medications and everyday chemicals known to be endocrine disruptors possibly play a role.

In the new study, researchers looked at data from 11 different studies that included more than 600,000 people around the world.

Women with a waist circumference of 94 cm (37 inches) had an 80 per cent higher mortality risk than those with waists that were 69 cm (27 inches) or less. For women with larger waists, that translates to a life expectancy five years shorter after age 40.

They found that men who had waists that were 109 cm (43 inches) or larger had twice the mortality risk than men with waists smaller than 89 cm (35 inches). For men with larger waists, this translated to a life expectancy that was three years shorter than their peers after age 40.

Bottom line a big waist means big health problems!