IF OUR BODY MAKES IT’S OWN ENZYMES WHY THEN DO WE NEED SUPPLEMENTAL DIGESTIVE ENZYMES?

A wide array of disorders can affect your digestive tract, a long tube of organs that begins at your mouth and ends at your anus.  Over ninety million people suffer everyday from some form of digestive issues (heartburn, acid reflux, GERD (gastroesophageal reflex disorder), IBS (irritable bowel syndrome), indigestion constipation, diarrhea, abdominal pain, etc.).

  • Your body produces digestive enzymes. However, it cannot produce enough digestive enzymes to keep up with the typical western diet, which is full of enzyme-depleted, cooked, and processed foods. This is one of the reasons why so many people suffer from digestive-related health problems.
  • Add to this fact that genetically modified foods cannot be broken down properly and seen by the immune system as an allergy.  80% of our immune system is located in our digestive tract.
  • If you were not breastfed as an infant and/or given solid food too early in life would make you a likely candidate.
  • As we age our ability to produce digestive enzymes decreases by 13 percent every ten-year period.
  • If you suffer from gluten sensitivities.
  • If you have been diagnosed with a disease.

There are some diseases that are marked by an abnormal response by the body’s immune system. Normally, the immune cells protect the body from infection. In some people however, the immune system mistakes food, bacteria, and other materials in the intestine for foreign substances and it attacks the cells of the intestines. In the process, the body sends white blood cells into the lining of the intestines where they produce chronic inflammation.

2 thoughts on “IF OUR BODY MAKES IT’S OWN ENZYMES WHY THEN DO WE NEED SUPPLEMENTAL DIGESTIVE ENZYMES?

  1. Hi I read that Amylase is bad for u, because when taking it digest carbohydrates to fast and causes the blood sugar to spike dangerously high. Is it true that amylase cause carbs to digest to fast and cause extreme high blood sugar???? Thanks

    • Hi Nita, Thank you for your question. The first enzyme discovered was amylase and there has been some confusion since then. When we started teaching about enzymes the only carbohydrate splitting enzyme we could get was amylase. However, enzymology has moved at mock speeds and now we have around 13 different carbohydrate splitting enzymes available to us. The only carbohydrate amylase breaks down is starch. Amylase works with other carbohydrate splitting enzymes to breakdown carbohydrates effectively but by itself it breaks down starch into glucose.

      There is a biochemical type that has problems with starchy foods. In that case it is effective for them. When formulating for the public I try to keep amylase enzymes in balance with the other enzymes. There is no need for just a single amylase product because it works with others to properly breakdown carbohydrates. It is the opinion of Enzymology Science (2006) that it is not to be used by itself primarily for diabetics.

      I hope that makes sense you were very close to being correct.

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